Professional Advice

Dr Schlosser from the American Academy of Dermatology says with acne, it’s important for patients to understand that there are no quick fixes, and none of the therapies used to treat acne work overnight. Patients need to be consistent when using their acne medications and realize that they may not see the full effects of their treatment regimen for eight to 10 weeks — and in many case, some type of maintenance therapy is required for long-term clearance of acne¹.

  • Dr. Schlosser advises patients to use non-comedogenic or sensitive skin products in order to reduce the formation of new acne lesions and to minimize skin irritation.
  • Mild cleansers should be used twice a day.
  • Avoid cleansers or other skin care products with scrubbing particles or a gritty texture, as they can irritate the skin.
  • Use a non-comedogenic moisturizer daily. Apply the appropriate amount of topical acne medications (enough for a very thin layer, generally a pea-sized amount for the face) to the skin. Using more medication than is recommended will not produce better results, but may cause more irritation or dryness.
  • Avoid picking, squeezing, popping or otherwise manipulating acne lesions to minimize trauma to the skin to help reduce the risk of scarring and secondary bacterial infections.

References

1). AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY. SAN DIEGO (March 16, 2012) — Information presented at American Academy of Dermatology’s 70th Annual Meeting by Bethanee Jean Schlosser, MD, PhD, FAAD, assistant professor of dermatology and director of Women’s Skin Health at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine http://www.aad.org/stories-and-news/news-releases/hormonal-factors-key-to-understanding-acne-in-women